During my time enrolling patients in the ED and the Trauma Room, I have always wondered whether minority patients experiences discrimination during their hospital visits.

 

Natalia Neha Khosla, a medical student at UChicago, has developed a research project that helps to address the issues of the situation. Apparently there have been numerous studies that show that black patients have received poor health care and outcomes in the U.S. The student states that the reason clinicians saw black patients as less likely to improve is because they saw those patients as less personally responsible for their health than white patients. She stated, “… that the reason clinicians saw black patients as less likely to improve is because they saw those patients as less personally responsible for their health than white patients. She also did this study with paitents in French hospitals, and she saw that there was no racial bias. This is possibly due to the fact that the French government does not request the racial identity of their citizens.

Science and medicine are not invulnerable to the effects of racism, because we are humans and are shaped by our environment. This is why it would not be wise to separate medicine from race. This is imperative to understand in order to treat patients without bias.